Tag Archive: Major depressive disorder


Chronic Pain: End of My Rope

I try so hard to be positive but there are times when I just can’t manage it. In fact, I think often times it is just a cover: I plaster a smile on my face and pretend that I am really doing better than I am. But today the floodgates have opened and I am crying. My fibromyalgia pain is through the roof and there is no point in pretending I am okay, because I am not. I just am not. I am pretty much non-functional and I have been that way for a while. Pain and unrelenting mind-boggling fatigue. I never even knew it was possible to feel this much fatigue. Imagine not sleeping for a year, that is how bad it feels. My pain is from the top of my head to my very toes. Aching, sharp pains and muscle spasms.

Imagine trying to type a simple post like this. It takes forever. My brain is in a fog all the time, I can’t remember how to spell, forget grammar as well. My hand co-ordination is horrible. My eye-sight is fuzzy even with new glasses and magnifying the page. It is the way you see when you have not slept..

Imagine being home bound because you can’t drive anymore without having accidents. I use the dial-a-ride service for the disabled. But when I go out I can’t enjoy myself. A simple shopping trip is torture. I use a cane because my balance is off. I once broke my knee in a fall. My muscles feel incredibly weak and heavy. I go to Walmart and first I go to the in-store McDonalds and treat myself. Then I slowly make my way around the store. I have to take breaks and sit down. It is especially trying if I need to get stuff from both sides of the store.

I used to enjoy browsing, now I can’t do it. I need new clothes and the thought of having to look and try them on is overwhelming.

It may take several days to recover from my shopping. The pain and fatigue is always worse afterwards.

All I can say is if you have good health, treasure it! I am 50 years old going on 90.

Needless to say this is not conducive to good mental health. For a long time before I got sick and when I was working at the mental health social center I thought I would never be depressed again. Never say never I guess.

Conventional medicine has no answers for this except medication. I am already on a ton of medication for bipolar disorder. Some of the medications I take actually are used to treat fibromyalgia as well as they are supposed to reduce nerve pain. But they don’t work for me.

Another option is addictive pain killers. No thanks, I already got in trouble with sleeping pills and tranquilizers years back. Besides one of the insidious affects of pain pills is that your body can get used to them and they are not as effective. So the dose has to be raised. This leads to addiction but that is not all. I have read comments on online forums from people with fibromyalgia where they say that they keep having to be put on harder and harder drugs to get relief, but there obviously is a limit to how big a dose you can get without killing yourself. What ends up happening is that they run out of options, even the strongest ones don’t work anymore.

Now I will say that everyone reacts to medications differently so not everyone has this problem. But the operative word here is “tolerance” People who get addicted to medications when their bodies process medications differently than other people. I have already had that experience with tranquilizers and sleeping pills where the effects wore off and the doctor just kept raising the dosage. After a while I was in a constant state of withdrawal and started to abuse them both.

By the way a good doctor will monitor a patient for signs of tolerance. Mine didn’t. I just thought my symptoms were getting worse. I had never done drugs in my life and so it never occurred to me that I could become an addict.

So…what are my options? I can’t go on this way, that is for sure. Truth be told, many times I do not want to live anymore. But I am not going to take that road again. I have hurt people before with my suicide attempts and I am not going to do that again. But there are times when I pray for God to take me. Since I am still here I guess I know what the answer is.

I am going to do some research online on using meditation for pain management. I have not thought too much about it because frankly, it is pretty difficult to meditate when you are in pain. But since I keep seeing headlines that say that meditation helps then maybe I should look more closely. Maybe it is a different method than what I have tried before.

I just want to get functional again and maybe even have a little joy in my life. I may never get the life back that I used to have, but I just need to stop this black hole that is eating me alive.

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Anyone out there who loves taking meds? What? The silence is deafening!

Most of us have a love/hate relationship with our pharmaceuticals. Here is a wonderful satirical piece from the Onion illustrating a innovative way to increase patient compliance. I’ll let you guys read this while I search for my medication, Damnitall:

Wonder Drug Inspires Deep, Unwavering Love Of Pharmaceutical Companies

NewsScience & TechnologyproductshealthISSUE 42•10Mar 6, 2006
 

NEW YORK—The Food and Drug Administration today approved the sale of the drug PharmAmorin, a prescription tablet developed by Pfizer to treat chronic distrust of large prescription-drug manufacturers.

Pfizer executives characterized the FDA’s approval as a “godsend” for sufferers of independent-thinking-related mental-health disorders.

PharmAmorin, now relieving distrust of large pharmaceutical conglomerates in pharmacies nationwide.“Many individuals today lack the deep, abiding affection for drug makers that is found in healthy people, such as myself,” Pfizer CEO Hank McKinnell said. “These tragic disorders are reaching epidemic levels, and as a company dedicated to promoting the health, well-being, and long life of our company’s public image, it was imperative that we did something to combat them.”

Although many psychotropic drugs impart a generalized feeling of well-being, PharmAmorin is the first to induce and focus intense feelings of affection externally, toward for-profit drug makers. Pfizer representatives say that, if taken regularly, PharmAmorin can increase affection for and trust in its developers by as much as 96.5 percent.

“Out of a test group of 180, 172 study participants reported a dramatic rise in their passion for pharmaceutical companies,” said Pfizer director of clinical research Suzanne Frost. “And 167 asked their doctors about a variety of prescription medications they had seen on TV.”

Frost said a small percentage of test subjects showed an interest in becoming lobbyists for one of the top five pharmaceutical companies, and several browsed eBay for drug-company apparel.

PharmAmorin, available in 100-, 200-, and 400-mg tablets, is classified as a critical-thinking inhibitor, a family of drugs that holds great promise for the estimated 20 million Americans who suffer from Free-Thinking Disorder.

Pfizer will also promote PharmAmorin in an aggressive, $34.6 million print and televised ad campaign.

One TV ad, set to debut during next Sunday’s 60 Minutes telecast, shows a woman relaxing in her living room and reading a newspaper headlined “Newest Drug Company Scandal Undermines Public Trust.” The camera zooms into the tangled neural matter of her brain, revealing a sticky black substance and a purplish gas.

The narrator says, “She may show no symptoms, but in her brain, irrational fear and dislike of global pharmaceutical manufacturers is overwhelming her very peace of mind.”

After a brief summary of PharmAmorin’s benefits, the commercial concludes with the woman flying a kite across a sunny green meadow, the Pfizer headquarters gleaming in the background.

PharmAmorin is the first drug of its kind, but Pfizer will soon face competition from rival pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb. The company is developing its own pro-pharmaceutical-company medication, Brismysquibicin, which will induce warm feelings not just for drug corporations in general, but solely for Bristol-Myers Squibb.

“A PharmAmorin user could find himself gravitating toward the products of a GlaxoSmithKline or Eli Lilly,” BMS spokesman Andrew Fike said. “This could seriously impede the patient’s prescription-drug-market acceptance, or worse, Pfizer’s profits in the long run.”

“Brismysquibicin will be cheaper to produce and therefore far more affordable to those on fixed incomes,” Fike added.

The news of an affordable skepticism-inhibitor was welcomed by New York physician Christine Blake-Mann, who runs a free clinic in Spanish Harlem.

“A lot of my patients are very leery of the medical establishment,” Blake-Mann said. “This will help them feel better about it, and save money at the same time.”

PharmAmorin’s side effects include nausea, upset stomach, and ignoring the side effects of prescription drug medication.

Go to the original article.

Laughter is great medicine so get your fix at The Onion.

Heh, heh…I remember when the allergy drug Allegra came out, the ads never got around to telling you what it was for. They just showed a very happy woman surfing across a wheat field. I kept thinking I want what she is having…

Alas, I still can’t find that damn prescription Damnitall, damn it all!   😦

 

 

Synapse. Tweaked version of Image:SynapseIllus...

Oh man, nothing makes me so angry as when people peddle misinformation as being fact, especially when it comes to psychiatric medications. While I acknowledge that not all people are helped by them and that some have bad reactions to them, the anti-medication movement is often riddled with ridiculous statements such as “Antidepressants damage the brain and cause people to become sociopaths.”  My conscience is very much intact, thank you very much. And that goes for others I know who take antidepressants as well.

I am focusing in this post on antidepressant medications, although the same principles apply to many other psychiatric medications as well. But I hear antidepressants being brought up more often than others, and I have studied them more than others as well.  I want to say upfront that I am not a medical professional. I am a mental health consumer who believes knowledge is power, so I have done my own research on this.

There are more subtle charges about antidepressants than what I posted above, that are more believable to people who don’t know the facts.

“Antidepressants work no better than a placebo”

Partly true. The end should say “For mild to moderate depression.”  But for major clinical depression and bipolar depression they do work. The logical conclusion is that many if not most of mild to moderate cases of depression are situational, rather than biological. Antidepressants are not designed to treat non-biological depression.  Unfortunately the overprescribing of antidepressants to those who don’t need them has resulted in a backlash from the public and the media is not always reporting the entire story.

Another charge is this:

“It says right in the antidepressant drug information that they don’t know how it works so the hypothesis that it corrects a chemical imbalance must be wrong.”

Again, partly true. It does say that it is “thought to work” by correcting a chemical imbalance in the brain. But there are many non-psychiatric medications that have the same type of caveat. Just because they don’t always know exactly how a medication works does not mean that it is a useless medication. It is results that matter. Some research has shown that perhaps it causes an increase in neurons which might account for why it may take up to a few weeks to become effective. It may also be a case of multiple effects that are in play as well. Perhaps the medication affects both the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain AND increases neurons. It has to be pointed out that until recently it was thought that the brain could not regenerate and produce new cells. That has been proven wrong with the new science of neuroplasticity or neurogenesis.  My next post is going to go into how the hypothesis of the chemical imbalance came about. It was not an unreasonable idea in light of the knowledge of the brain they had at the time, in the 1950’s. But I want to point out that the “chemical imbalance” hypothesis, while it is being challenged, has not been disproven either. It is up in the air at the moment.

One thing that many people don’t understand is that science progresses in stages and it is self-correcting as well. No scientist will ever claim that they understand everything perfectly. When  I debate people on scientific research, I point out this as an example of how science works. While Isaac Newton was a brilliant man, he never actually understood what gravity is. He was the one who discovered the principle or the theory of gravity and described its mathematical qualities but he didn’t know what it was or the cause of it. Others built upon his discovery so that we have a more complete view now.  But even now there are mysteries because Newtonian physics and Quantum physics should not be able to exist side by side as they contradict each other. Yet they do, not because either one of them is wrong, but because our understanding is incomplete.

And gravity works, whether you understand it or not. The same principle applies with medications.

This is just something to keep in mind when people claim that “such and such research” has been “disproven”, many times based on only one study. Studies have to be replicated in order to have any validity at all. And the human brain is a rather difficult organ to do research on. Lab animals can be subjected to medications and also be controlled for variables. Then they are killed and their brains dissected. You can’t do that with people. So studies have to be based on effectiveness, not on a complete understanding of the pathology of the mentally ill brain.

But the one that really “Grinds my gears” is when people compare psychiatric medications to addictive illegal drugs.

“Antidepressants change the levels of neurotransmitters and alter receptors. Cocaine also changes the levels of both dopamine and serotonin, as well as noradrenaline, and alters receptors.”

This is one of the most insidious charges around. The fact is that many medications affect the levels of neurotransmitters and possibly receptors as well.  That does not automatically mean that they are bad for you or are addictive. Many migraine medications, and drugs for Parkinson’s disease for example. In fact any medication that can cross the blood-brain barrier is likely to affect the brain in some manner, such as with older antihistamine medications that cause drowsiness and are still a popular ingredient in over-the-counter sleep medications.

The difference between a horrendously addictive and destructive drug  and an antidepressant is HOW it works in the brain. Cocaine does raise the “feel-good” chemicals in the brain, temporarily, by causing them all to be released at once. That is what causes people to feel high. When you come down though, those chemicals are depleted and then you become depressed and your body craves another high.

On the other hand, antidepressant medication does not cause a high and is thought to work by conserving the levels of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the re-uptake into the cells. It essentially is recycling the chemicals that would otherwise be broken down by the body, meaning more of it is available for use in the brain.

Those are two completely different processes and in fact antidepressants do exactly the opposite of what cocaine does! Cocaine depletes, antidepressants conserve!

If anyone challenges you on taking “happy pills” ask them what the street value for these things are. The answer is zero.

The only psychiatric medications that you need to watch out for are tranquilizers and sleeping pills. Some people do end up abusing them. You and your doctor need to watch out for signs of tolerance, needing more to have the same effect. If you are uncomfortable taking these medications, ask your doctor for non-addictive medications or other ways to manage your symptoms. And please do not get the term ‘major tranquilizers” confused with the term “tranquilizers” as the former is an old-fashioned term for antipsychotics, which are not addictive.

The answer to all this insanity is to educate yourself and others (if they are open to that). Learn what your medications are and how they work. All the information I have supplied here is readily available online and you can also ask your doctor. Read the drug information from the pharmacy too and ask the pharmacist questions as well. Knowledge is power!  😉

 

 

Reblogged from Science Daily:

 

Spirituality, religion may protect against major depression by thickening brain cortex

Date:
January 16, 2014
Source:
Columbia University, Teachers College

A thickening of the brain cortex associated with regular meditation or other spiritual or religious practice could be the reason those activities guard against depression — particularly in people who are predisposed to the disease, according to new research led by Lisa Miller, professor and director of Clinical Psychology and director of the Spirituality Mind Body Institute at Teachers College, Columbia University.

The study, published online by JAMA Psychiatry, involved 103 adults at either high or low risk of depression, based on family history. The subjects were asked how highly they valued religion or spirituality. Brain MRIs showed thicker cortices in subjects who placed a high importance on religion or spirituality than those who did not. The relatively thicker cortex was found in precisely the same regions of the brain that had otherwise shown thinning in people at high risk for depression.

Although more research is necessary, the results suggest that spirituality or religion may protect against major depression by thickening the brain cortex and counteracting the cortical thinning that would normally occur with major depression. The study, published on Dec. 25, 2013, is the first published investigation on the neuro-correlates of the protective effect of spirituality and religion against depression.

“The new study links this extremely large protective benefit of spirituality or religion to previous studies which identified large expanses of cortical thinning in specific regions of the brain in adult offspring of families at high risk for major depression,” Miller said.

Previous studies by Miller and the team published in the American Journal of Psychiatry (2012) showed a 90 percent decrease in major depression in adults who said they highly valued spirituality or religiosity and whose parents suffered from the disease. While regular attendance at church was not necessary, a strong personal importance placed on spirituality or religion was most protective against major depression in people who were at high familial risk

See original article here.

 

This is such a realistic and compassionate point of view on Robin William’s suicide that I just have to share it. Be warned that this may be triggering for some people.

From the Patheos blog Camels With Hammers

 

Robin Williams’s Verdict on Life

 

 

Hi Peeps!

I rarely ever bring up political news on my blog but this one really disturbs me. Recently in the news they have talked about the “record high” of people on disability insurance. Below I have an article from Media Matters refuting the exaggeration of the “problem” But first I will put in my two cents.

Since some mental health consumers get disability at least for a short time then we need to be proactive against those who would cruelly hurt the mentally ill (and in fact all disabled persons). And despite what conservatives say, it is not easy to get in the first place. There are very few cases of fraud.

One of the big reasons that more people are on disability is simply because we have an aging population. It is not right to judge simply on the basis of numbers. Or by the way a person looks.

Many disabled people get judged by others simply based on the fact that you can’t always see a disability. I have experienced that myself, having both bipolar disorder and fibromyalgia. The people closest to me can see that I am disabled. The average person could not. And mentally ill people do not all go around talking to themselves all the time or exhibiting other odd behaviors. They can seem quite normal, until they have a relapse. A client at the mental health center I used to work at had schizophrenia. He had a relapse and within less than a week he became homeless and destitute. He was fired from his job and kicked out of his housing because they thought he was on drugs. He was afraid to tell them the truth because mental illness carries a worse stigma than drug use.

THIS IS WHY WE NEED SAFETY NETS

That is a good example but still many people do not understand that bipolar and other depressive disorders are just as disabling (and some do exhibit symptoms similar to schizophrenia, I have.)

It really is just about impossible to keep a job if you are crying all the time, or are manic and behaving irrationally. Add to it loss of touch with reality and the odds of keeping your job are zero. I got fired from a job that I had kept for 12 years because I was depressed and out of touch with reality. I was behaving oddly and made an accusation against a co-worker that was due to the fact that I could not separate reality from non-reality.

This is not to say that mental health consumers can never recover and lead productive lives. But we have to be careful to make sure that if there is a relapse that they can get help. Currently the law allows those who relapse after going off of disability to have their benefits re-instated.

And there are some that may never be able to work at all and they should not be judged.

A good line to say to those who think that you are faking your problems is to say “You may not see my disability, but I can sure see yours!” 😉

This article is from Media Matters:

Two Charts That Show Conservatives Don’t Understand Disability 

HANNAH GROCH-BEGLEY

Conservative media hyped a misleading chart attempting to show that the number of Americans receiving federal disability benefits has reached unsustainable highs, comparing the figure of recipients to the population of random countries around the world. Accurate charts putting the figure in reasonable context, however, show that the number of needy Americans in this safety net program is astonishingly low.

On May 21 Fox News and the Drudge Report hyped the findings of conservative news site CNS which pushed the false idea that too many Americans are currently receiving Social Security Disability Insurance, stating that the number has reached “a new all-time record” and featuring a graph blasting the fact that more people get disability benefits than live in Greece and Tunisia:

 

From CNS News, Disability Beneficiaries Compared to Other Countries' Populations

There are also more people in the state of Ohio than Greece or Tunisia, but that isn’t cause for alarm. A more accurate graph showing the number of Americans who receive this necessary benefit shows that compared to the total number of Americans who have disabilities, and the total population of the U.S., relatively few individuals are on this government program:

U.S. Disability Benefits in Context: Chart

Right-wing media have a history of misleading about federal disability programs as part of their campaign to deceptively portray the programs as wasteful and unsustainable. In reality, these programs have low fraud rates, are highly difficult to qualify for, and help the rising number of Americans with severe disabilities survive when they are unable to work.

UPDATE: CNS’ original chart is even more misleading than Media Matters originally noted. Their chart starts the y-axis at 10.4 million, rather than zero, exaggerating the difference between the number of disability beneficiaries and the populations of various random countries. For better context, we have updated our improved chart to show what CNS’ graph would look like if it included the full U.S. population at the correct scale and started the y-axis at zero: Read more…

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National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This inspiring story is from www.deeperstory.com/your-story-worth-finishing

Your Story is Worth Finishing

by Luke

Content Warning: This post speaks candidly of suicide and suicidal ideations.

The purpose of this post is to raise awareness for National Suicide Prevention Week. Know the signs. Be involved. Be a safe place. Go to the NSPW website to learn more.

I. The Wound.

Two years ago, I was sitting alone on the floor of my closet at 2 in the morning with the cold, metallic heft of release resting in my lap. I can still remember what it felt like. It was heavy and awkward in my clammy hands as my fingers traced the letters etched into the slide:

9mm

It wasn’t the first time in my life I’d been down this road, but it was definitely the farthest I’d ever ventured down it. There had been thoughts in the past, even some rough plans, but never this detailed. I was ready, except I hadn’t written a note.
_____

I’ve struggled with depression my whole life. I self-medicated with whatever I could – adrenaline, food, a little pot, more than a little alcohol and a lot of prescription drugs. But you probably never would’ve known. My family and friends didn’t know while I was growing up. I was an athlete, an honor student, a musician. I was involved in church. I had some genuinely great friends. On the outside I looked like the kid that had it all together, while on the inside, I was fighting just to hold on.

And so the charade continued.

Two years ago, I was “successful.” Two years ago I was “happy.” Two years ago, I had a good job and a wonderful family and all of those things that let us know that we’ve made it.

But I was broken. The birth of our second son marked the break in the walls of compartmentalization I had so carefully and painstakingly built, and years of repressed psychological and emotional damage came flooding in. I was out of control. I needed to regain control, and this, I reasoned, was one way to do it.
_____

But I still needed to write a note.

I sat contemplating how to frame the end of my story, trying to find the words to make sure my wife didn’t blame herself, as my thumb involuntarily stroked the safety. How could I make her understand, make them all understand that it would be better this way, that they would be better off this way?

But I waited too long. My oldest son cried out in his sleep with a night terror. Instinct took over, and before I knew what I was doing, the gun was back in the safe and the boy was in my arms, body racked with sobs of terror and tears streaming down his face.

At some point, I’m not sure when, I realized that he’d stopped crying, and that the sobs were mine.

The tears were mine.

Some day I’ll tell him that he saved my life. Some day I’ll tell him that his tiny hand on my face that night was the first thing I’d really felt in almost a decade. Some day I’ll tell him that it was at that moment in his bedroom in the middle of the night that I realized there was a different way to take control.

I started thinking about a new note, one to reach out for help instead of offering premature goodbyes.

II. To the Wounded

You think that you don’t matter. You think you’re invisible. You think you’re alone, that your life has no value. You think that not being alive is better than being in whatever hellish reality you’re living in. You need to control something, and you think this is the only way to do it.

But you do matter. Maybe you don’t have a two year old with impeccable timing to let you know that you matter, so this is me telling you that you do. You matter to you. You matter to people around you that you don’t even realize. You matter to me because I see you on the same road that I was on, and this is me going right back down that road to get you.

This is me opening doors that I’ve never dared to open publicly because the fact that you’re reading this means maybe you’re looking for a reason not to and I’m telling you that this is it. This is me, jumping up and down, waving my arms and screaming that I see you, that you’re not alone, that your life has value. This is me telling you all of the things that I wish someone would have told me when I started down that road. It is worth it. You’re worth it. You are loved, you are loved, you are loved.

If you close the book now, when the drama in the story is at its most fevered and the pain most intense, you’ll never know how the hero of your story would’ve turned out.

Your story matters, and it’s worth finishing.

The world is full of people who’ve been to those dark places but who came out the other side and discovered a better way to take control: by re-writing their own stories.

Reaching out for help was one of the hardest, most painful things that I’ve ever done. Healing is ugly and it’s messy and it takes a long time and there will always be scars, but what matters is that our stories go on. My story could have ended with a widow wondering what she possibly could have done and two boys growing up wondering why their dad left them alone, but instead, it’s still being written. The pages are dog-eared and highlihgted with words and lines and whole paragraphs crossed out in some places, but in spite of all the edits, it’s a story that’s worth finishing.

And so is yours.

“Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Do not be afraid.” – Frederick Buechner

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, please seek help. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline has trained counselors available 24/7 at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). If you don’t want to talk to a stranger, reach out to a family member or a friend. Talk to a pastor or priest. Talk to someone, anyone. If you’re tooo scared or embarrassed to talk to anyone else, you can talk to me. You can @ me or DM me on twitter @lukeharms or email me at luke (dot) a (dot) harms (at) gmail (dot) com. Take control by reaching out and deciding to heal.

Divine Feminine Power

Divine Feminine Power (Photo credit: Kathy Crabbe)

I am reposting this from a year ago. I hope you like it: 

One ship drives east and the other drives west by the self-same winds that blow. It’s the set of the sails and not the gales that determine the way they go.

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Sometimes we feel like the winds of fate continuously buffet us around, thwarting our every dream. We may fall into a deep depression and give up. Psychologists call this “learned helplessness”. It is important to note that what can be learned can be unlearned. We can choose at any moment to take our power back. It may not be easy, it may take time, but we can learn to control our lives again instead of drowning in our depressions. The point of power is in you and the key is Intention. We are made in the image and likeness of God; therefore we have all of God’s attributes, including power. We are powerful! All you have to do is claim that power and know that God is more powerful than any circumstance, internal or external that you may encounter.

Write down every situation that feels impossible for you to overcome. Then repeat after each one, “I AM more powerful than this.”

RECOVERY FROM BIPOLAR DISORDER IS POSSiBLE.  This is a post from about a year ago. Enjoy!

English: Total Solar eclipse 1999 in France. *...
English: Total Solar eclipse 1999 in France. * Additional noise reduction performed by Diliff. Original image by Luc Viatour. Français : L’éclipse totale de soleil en 1999 faite en France. * Réduction du bruit réalisée par Diliff. Image d’origine Luc Viatour. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Finding Hope

It is very frightening to fall into the abyss of bipolar depression. It is like the eclipse of the sun, plunging us into darkness and chaos. Suddenly nothing seems certain. Our dreams and hopes for the future are shattered. We wonder if we will ever be the same again. We may be so lost that we end up in hospitals and institutions, receiving frightening treatments and medicated to the hilt. We feel like freaks, isolated from society and often rejected and misunderstood by our family and friends. We may even attempt suicide as a way to end our pain. How then can we find hope? How do we make sense of what has happened to us? Read more

 

A little light lunchtime reading...

A little light lunchtime reading… (Photo credit: Austin Kleon)

Hello Peeps! Here is another post from about a year ago for my new followers. I hope you all find it helpful!

Whatever is to give light must endure burning
Viktor Frankl

There is no doubt that as people with bipolar disorder we have suffered greatly, a suffering that most people cannot understand. We have stood on the pinnacle of life and also in the depths of hell. It is not self-pity to recognize where we have come from, but we cannot stay there. Being a helpless victim is a form of living death. We must take the lessons we have learned from our experiences and move forward…Read the rest of the article..